The Horse and His Boy

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Title: The Horse and His Boy
Author: C.S. Lewis
Series: The Chronicles of Narnia, 3/7
Genre: Adventure, Allegorical, Classics, Fantasy, Middle Grade, YA
Publisher: Harper Collins 
Release Date: September 6th, 1954

Note: This post reviews the third book of The Chronicles of Narnia series. You may like to read the first two books in the series, The Magician’s Nephew and The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, before reading this review. 

For seven weeks, I will be reviewing The Chronicles of Narnia, a classic in my opinion. I’ve lost track of how many times I have read these books. Hopefully my reviews will give you a glimpse of why I love these books so much, and maybe even convince you to read them if you haven’t already.

The Horse and His Boy is a special book in the series because it is the only one that takes place in Narnia only, without any children traveling from our world. Separated from his family as a child, Shasta grows up as little more than a slave. His world turns upside down one day when he meets a talking horse – a Narnian horse. They escape together, in hopes of making a better life for themselves.

It is not long before they team up with another talking horse and rider, Aravis. The four of them embark on a great adventure together, encountering their fair share of struggles along the way. By the time they make it to Narnia, none of them are the same – especially Shasta, who finally learns the truth of who he really is.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

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Title: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
Author: C.S. Lewis
Series: The Chronicles of Narnia, 2/7
Genre: Adventure, Allegorical, Classics, Fantasy, Middle Grade, YA
Publisher: Harper Collins 
Release Date: October 16th, 1950

Note: This post reviews the second book of The Chronicles of Narnia series. You may like to read the first book in the series, The Magician’s Nephew, before reading this review. 

For seven weeks, I will be reviewing The Chronicles of Narnia, a classic in my opinion. I’ve lost track of how many times I have read these books. Hopefully my reviews will give you a glimpse of why I love these books so much, and maybe even convince you to read them if you haven’t already.

A normal game of hide-and-seek becomes so much more when Lucy Pevensie takes refuge in a wardrobe and finds herself in another world… Narnia. Here, it is eternal winter, a curse of the White Witch, who is none other than the Empress Jadis. When Lucy returns to England and tells her three siblings – Peter, Susan, and Edmund – what happened, they do not believe her. It isn’t until the four of them later enter the wardrobe as a last resort that they realize Lucy was right – and all four of them enter Narnia together.

They quickly learn that this world is not safe for them. Because of an ancient prophecy, the White Witch has been waiting for four children who are destined to become kings and queens of Narnia. But she will never let that happen. She manages to deceive Edmund, poisoning him with her words and magic, leading him to betray his brother and sisters. There is only one who is powerful enough to undo the damage Edmund has done – Aslan. And the price is greater than anyone could have ever imagined.

The Magician’s Nephew

Title: The Magician’s Nephew
Author: C.S. Lewis
Series: The Chronicles of Narnia, 1/7
Genre: Adventure, Allegorical, Classics, Fantasy, Middle Grade, YA
Publisher: Harper Collins 
Release Date: May 2nd, 1955

If you are new to this series, I would recommend reading the books in this order (which is also the order in which I will review the series):
1. The Magician’s Nephew
2. The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe
3. The Horse and His Boy
4. Prince Caspian
5. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader
6. The Silver Chair
7. The Last Battle

For the next seven weeks, I will be reviewing The Chronicles of Narnia, a classic in my opinion. I’ve lost track of how many times I have read these books. Hopefully my reviews will give you a glimpse of why I love these books so much, and maybe even convince you to read them if you haven’t already.

During a London day of indoor exploration, Digory and Polly stumble upon a magician’s workshop. Digory is shocked to learn that his own Uncle Andrew is that magician. While he has the two children there with him, Uncle Andrew persuades Polly to try on ring – a magic ring of course. Immediately after trying on the ring, Polly vanishes. (This is the one of those times you can tell that C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien were good friends.) Digory, having no other option but to try to save his friend, puts on a ring of his own and follows Polly into the unknown. They arrive in the Wood Between the Worlds.

With small pools as their keys to other worlds, they cross into another world. There, the unthinkable happens – they awaken Jadis, a powerful, cruel Empress who follows them back to London. Jadis wreaks havoc on this unfamiliar world, and it is clear to Digory and Polly that she cannot stay there. Using the rings once again, they travel back to the Wood Between the Worlds, and into a seemingly empty world. Empty, that is, until Aslan the lion begins to bring it to life, creating the world of Narnia.

The Magician’s Nephew might just be my favorite book of the series. (You are probably going to hear me say that more than once as I review these books.) Not only does the idea of magic-ring traveling appeal to me, but I love the character Jadis. She appears in the next book as the White Witch, but we get to know her so much better in this book. I also enjoy seeing the creation of Narnia before all of the adventures in it take place. The Magician’s Nephew is hands down the book to begin with.

Click on the links below to get your copy of this book and the others in its series:

 

A Christmas Carol

Title: A Christmas Carol
Author: Charles Dickens
Genre: Classics, Fantasy, Holiday, Literature
First Published: December 19th, 1843

A Christmas Carol: the timeless classic of Ebenezer Scrooge that has been adapted by film more times that I could count. The story of a changed heart of a man who missed out on the true meaning of life. Ultimately, it is a story of redemption, which is the whole point of Christmas in the first place.

Told in five staves, A Christmas Carol takes us on a fantastic journey with Scrooge as he has one supernatural encounter after another. First he is greeted by the ghost of his business partner, Jacob Marley, who implores him to change his avaricious ways before he meets a similar fate. Later, he is visited by three spirits of Christmas: Past, Present, and Future. These spirits remind him of where he has been, show the beauty and the struggle of the here and now, and hint at the possibilities to come. Scrooge must face his past and improve his present if he is to have a chance of redemption in his future.

I cannot tell you enough how much I love this book. My husband and I read it out loud together every single year, and it is probably my favorite Christmas tradition. I love the old english writing and the nostalgia throughout the story. And the themes of Christ-like love, charity, and redemption are themes that are just as relevant and needed today as they were then.

MERRY CHRISTMAS! And “God bless us, every one.”

Click on the link below to get your copy of this book: